I am currently a third year PhD student on the complexity science doctoral training program at the University of Warwick, and a Zeeman Institute: Systems Biology & Infectious Disease Epidemiology Research (SBIDER) group member.

Information on conferences I have attended can be found here.

Update: I completed my PhD in July 2017. My thesis titled "Mathematical modelling approaches for spreading processes : zoonotic influenza and social contagion" can be found here.

I am now a post-doc in the Zeeman Institute: Systems Biology & Infectious Disease Epidemiology Research (SBIDER) group at the Univeristy of Warwick. I am working with Professor Matt Keeling on mathematical modelling of seasonal influenza to test existing and novel vaccination strategies, and using economic models to assess cost-effectiveness, to inform government policy.


Research Interests

Key topics of interest are:


PhD Project: Modelling influenza at the human-animal interface

Supervisors: Dr Thomas House & Dr Michael Tildesley

Influenza inhabits many hosts and has many strains. The biology and epidemiology of influenza is radically different depending on the host species: while ducks are essentially asymptomatic carriers of all influenza strains, in other birds and mammals influenza can be lethal. Very occasionally, humans become infected with a virus derived from non-human sources. These are essentially novel to humans. Due to the viruses meeting with little or no established resistance they can, following mutation and adaptation to their new host, spread relatively easily in the human species. This can give rise to a localised outbreak that may develop into a worldwide influenza pandemic.

There is a worrying gap in the modelling of spillover transmission from animals to humans. My project will focus on addressing the lack of established modelling tools that represent this interface, with the applied aim of aiding design of control strategies for influenza in presence of multiple strains at the animal-human interface, and their effectiveness.


Research Internship: Modelling visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil

During June-September 2016, I worked with Orin Courtenay and Erin Dilger, from the School of Life Sciences, and fellow mathematical modeller Elizabeth Buckingham-Jeffery on a four month research internship developing a mathematical model of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil; a vector borne disease with an animal reservoir. This will be used to inform intervention strategies.


Research Internship: Developing adaptive management frameworks to minimise impact of avian influenza outbreaks

During October 2016 - January 2017, I worked with Mike Tildesley on a four month research internship developing an adaptive management approach for modelling H5N1 avian influenza in Bangladesh. This methodology determines optimal control policies that can adapt to accrual of information to ensure that policy measures that are implemented are appropriate for the state of an infectious disease outbreak. This will enable policy makers in the region to implement interventions that will reduce the impact of future disease outbreaks.


Publications


Interviews

I wrote an article on our work modelling the spread of mood in school friendship networks for "The Conversation", and the article "When it comes to mental health, parents shouldn’t worry who their children are friends with" can be found here.


Previous Study


Other Activities

Professional development:
Reading Groups
Workshop/Conference Organisation
SSLC
Teaching